Don’t Miss: Arts&Heritage Projects Currently Open


16th August 2022

A&H currently has six fantastic Meeting Point projects, and a range of partnerships and collaborations which we have supported, open right across the country. Listed by region below, please do have a look and make a trip to some of them near you over the next few weeks.

South

Coralent by Emma Smith for The Brickworks Museum

Coralent, by Emma Smith at Brickworks Museum, Meeting Point © Pascal Vossen

Coralent – the name given to a pattern made of bricks – by visual artist, Emma Smith is now open at The Brickworks Museum. The commission sees an installation of suspended bricks hung from the ceiling of the drying room at The Brickworks Museum, with each one representing an individual worker from the industry. Each brick carries initials to commemorate the thousands of forgotten workers connected to the industry. To find out more, please click here.

Coralent is open at The Brickworks Museum, Hampshire, until October 2022.

This is an Arts&Heritage: Meeting Point project. 


Not just a garden by Anna Cady at Furzey Gardens

Not just a garden by Anna Cady, Meeting Point. Images provided by Anna Cady.

Created by artist Anna Cady, working with people from Minstead Trust, Not just a garden is an installation of films, images, and memorabilia looking at Furzey Gardens’ 100-year history and its role today as a place of support and work experience for people with learning disabilities. To find out more, please click here.

Not just a garden is open at Furzey Gardens, Hampshire until 18 December 2022.

This is an Arts&Heritage: Meeting Point project. 


The Train Effect by Savinder Bual for Didcot Railway Centre

The Train Effect by Savinder Bual for Didcot Railway Centre, Meeting Point © Savinder Bual

Artist Savinder Bual has created a film installation exploring the role of railways in the standardisation of time, currently on show at Didcot Railway Centre, Oxfordshire. The Train Effect is inspired by how, in 1840, the Great Western Railway introduced ‘Railway Time’, meaning a single, standardised time was used on its line, and subsequently across railway stations in Great Britain. For more information, please click here.

The Train Effect will be available to view online from September, more information on Savinder’s website.

This is an Arts&Heritage: Meeting Point project. 


Midlands

Cotton Labour by Hetain Patel for Cromford Mills

Cotton Labour by Hetain Patel at Cromford Mills, Meeting Point © Tom Cable

An artwork by award-winning British artist, Hetain Patel, commemorates forgotten workers from the UK and global cotton industry, at Cromford Mills in Derbyshire. Cotton Labour, a large scale sculpture of symbolic portraits woven from yarn, remembers workers that were crucial to the success of Sir Richard Arkwright’s cotton spinning mills during the industrial revolution, and depicts the local women and children that formed the majority of Cromford Mills’ labour force. To find out more, please click here.

Cotton Labour will be on show at Cromford Mills until Sunday 18 September 2022.

This is an Arts&Heritage: Meeting Point project. 


The Common Wealth Table at Birmingham Cathedral

The Common Wealth Table at Birmingham cathedral © Jac Doody

The Common Wealth Table at Birmingham Cathedral Square: designed by interdisciplinary creative studio Intervention Architecture and commissioned by the cathedral with Arts&Heritage, this temporary covered sculpture has been designed to encourage dwell time, interaction and conversation in a busy public space. The Common Wealth Table can be used casually or booked for a special group meal, workshop, event or performance.

The Common Wealth Table is a Creative City Project supported by Birmingham City Council as part of Birmingham 2022 Festival for the Commonwealth Games.

This project was created with support from Arts&Heritage.


North

Wassa by Lindsey Mendick and Dominic Watson at Washington Old Hall (National Trust)

Wassa by Lindsey Mendick and Dominic Watson at Washington Old Hall, Meeting Point © Jonathan Turner

Washington Old Hall‘s Great Hall is still hosting an art installation that brings together a cast of historical and mythical characters associated with the building and its local area, including George Washington, the first president of the United States. Named after the Anglo-Saxon family of Wass, it was created by artists Lindsey Mendick and Dominic Watson. Made mainly of papier-mâché and ceramics it takes the form of a fantasy medieval feast attended by guests plucked from local folklore fiction and fact. For more information, click here.

Wassa will be on show at Washington Old Hall until October 2022.

This is an Arts&Heritage: Meeting Point project. 


Home is Unspent by George Shaw and Thomas Bewick at Cherryburn (National Trust)

Home is Unspent by George Shaw at Cherryburn © Colin Davison

Cherryburn has been working alongside Turner Prize nominated artist George Shaw to host his exhibition: Home is Unspent – George Shaw and Thomas Bewick. Home is Unspent includes new, intimate paintings of Shaw’s childhood home following the death of his mother, capturing the spaces that remain and the shapes we leave behind. The works respond directly to the intimacy of Thomas Bewick’s Birthplace. Organised in collaboration with Ikon, Birmingham. For more information, click here.

Home is Unspent will be on show at Cherryburn until 28 October 2022.

This project was created with support from Arts&Heritage.


Song (After Nature) by Paul Rooney at Lindisfarne Castle (National Trust)

Artist Paul Rooney‘s interpretation of the space is an opportunity for visitors to experience Lindisfarne Castle in a completely different way to anything that they will have seen (or heard) here before. Song (After Nature), a contemporary soundscape installation, inspired by the island’s distinctive sounds can be heard through parts of the imposing 16th century castle. For more information, click here.

Song (After Nature) will be on show at Lindisfarne Castle until 30 October 2022.

This project was created with support from Arts&Heritage.


Gathering Downstream by Jen Southern at Quarry Bank (National Trust)

Jen Southern at Quarry Bank: image provided by Quarry Bank

Gathering Downstream is a specially commissioned exhibition by artist Jen Southern, in partnership with FutureEverything. The artwork, created with the help of machine learning technology, takes the form of five films, that are embedded in a river-like installation inside Quarry Bank’s historic cotton mill. To find out more, please click here.

Gathering Downstream will be on show at Quarry Bank until Friday 25 November 2022.

This project was created with support from Arts&Heritage.


Nothing Exists Alone by INSTAR at Wallington (National Trust)

Image provided by National Trust Wallington

Wallington worked with artists INSTAR to create a sculptural work  located on the River Walk. The piece was developed in response to the surrounding habitat, the resident wildlife and the threats and challenges faced by the natural world and uses feedback and observations from workshops carried out in early 2020. The final artwork will be in situ by Trout Bridge on the River Walk for two years. For more information, click here.

This project was created with support from Arts&Heritage.


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